Markforged Materials

Markforged engineering-grade composite materials for 3D printers enable you to print parts suitable for every stage in the manufacturing process. Markforged’s advanced materials include nylon, chopped carbon fiber, reinforced continous fiber, and metal.

ONYX

Nylon mixed with chopped carbon fiber offers a high-strength thermoplastic

Compatible with Onyx Pro, Mark Two, X3, X5, X7

How strong is Onyx Material for 3D Printing?

Onyx has a flexural strength of 81 MPa (11.7 ksi). For more information on Onyx material properties, check out the data sheet.

What is the difference between chopped carbon fiber and continuous carbon fiber?

Chopped carbon fiber is what is mixed into Onyx filament giving it high stiffness and strength. Continuous carbon fiber is a reinforcement fiber that can be printed in long strands, creating composite parts many times stronger and stiffer than Onyx material.

HEAT DEFLECTION TEMPERATURE (°C)

ONYX FR (Flame retardant)

V-0 rated nylon filled with chopped carbon fiber designed for strong, lightweight, flame-retardant parts

Compatible with X3, X5, X7

When to print with Onyx FR?

Onyx FR should be used to print parts that need high-strength, low-weight, and flame-retardant properties.

Applications

  • Aerospace
  • Automotive parts
  • Defense
  • Electronic Housings
Nylon White

It’s now possible to print in Nylon and Onyx on the same printhead

Compatible with Mark Two, X7

What is Nylon White?

Nylon White is an engineering thermoplastic that is non-abrasive and can be easily painted.

When to use Nylon White

  • When a smooth, non-abrasive surface is critical
  • When cosmetics are important
  • When chopped carbon fiber is not an option

Nylon White:

• Prints well on printers that have used Onyx
• Leads to better print outcomes
• Is stronger and stiffer
• Has increased durability from reduced moisture absorption
• Is easily paintable

Nylon White:
• Is even less abrasive
• Is not as strong (flexural)
• Is not as stiff
• Is not as impact resistant

AS COMPARED TO

Fiberglass

Inexpensive and 11 times stiffer than ABS, fiberglass is the perfect entry-level fiber for 3D printing

Compatible with Onyx Pro, Mark Two, X5, X7

What is fiberglass material?

Extremely thin strands of glass bundled together into a fiber. Fiberglass is traditionally used in composites for boat, automobile, and aircraft manufacture.

How strong is fiberglass?

Fiberglass has a flexural strength of 210 MPa (30.5 ksi) and a tensile strength of 590 MPa (85.5 ksi). For more information on 3D printed fiberglass material properties, check out the data sheet.

FLEXURAL STIFFNESS (GPa)

HSHT Fiberglass

Delivers the highest impact resistance and heat deflection temperature of Markforged’s continuous fibers

Compatible with Mark Two, X7

When to print with high strength high temperature (HSHT) fiberglass?

With superior heat resistance and a flexural strength that is second only to carbon fiber, HSHT fiberglass is ideal for applications requiring high heat and impact resistance or high elasticity.

How strong is high strength high temperature fiberglass?

HSHT fiberglass has a flexural strength of 420 MPa (71 ksi) and a tensile strength of 600 MPa (87 ksi). For more information on HSHT fiberglass material properties, check out the data sheet.

IMPACT RESISTANCE (J/m)

Kevlar

Kevlar is tough, lightweight material, and can bend further than any other fiber, making it ideal for 3D printing.

Compatible with Mark Two, X7

When to print with Kevlar material?

Kevlar is best utilized in parts that will take a beating. Its low density and high durability make it a great option for applications involving a lot of motion or interfacing with production parts.

What is Kevlar material?

Kevlar is a synthetic fiber developed and produced by DuPont. Know for its light weight and toughness, it is traditionally used in products such as tires, sails, rope, and protective equipment. Kevlar is an excellent material for 3D printing.

FLEXURAL STRENGTH (MPa)

Carbon fiber

Markforged’s stiffest, strongest fiber with the highest strength-to-weight ratio

Compatible with Mark Two, X7

What is carbon fiber?

Carbon fiber is a thin filament made up of carbon atoms organized into a crystalline structure. Because of its very high stiffness and strength it is widely used in the aerospace and automotive industries.

How strong is carbon fiber?

Carbon fiber has a flexural strength of 470 MPa (68 ksi) which is 20% higher than the yield strength of 6061 aluminum. Its tensile strength is 700 MPa (102 ksi), more than twice the ultimate tensile strength of aluminum. To learn more about carbon fiber material properties, check out the data sheet.

STRENGTH TO WEIGHT (N⋅m/kg)

17-4 PH Stainless Steel

3D print metal more affordably than ever before

Compatible with Metal X

When to print with 17-4 PH Stainless Steel?

17-4 PH Stainless Steel is a hard, stiff, and corrosion resistant stainless steel. It excels in manufacturing environments and as low volume parts.

Working with 17-4 PH Stainless Steel

17-4 PH Stainless steel is best heat treated to maximize strength, hardness, or toughness. H900 condition, heating your part to 900F (482C) for four hours, yields the strongest and hardest possible parts. H1150 condition (1150F instead of 900F) can also be used to maximize toughness at the expense of ultimate tensile strength.

Metal 17-4 PH Stainless Steel
As Sintered 1050 MPa
Heat Treated 1250 MPa

Metal
17-4 PH Stainless Steel

As Sintered30 HRC
Heat Treated36 HRC
H-13 Tool Steel

Tool steel optimized for high temperature and wear applications

Compatible with Metal X

When to print with H13 Tool Steel?

H13 works excellently in high temperature and can withstand drastic cooling. This, coupled with abrasion resistance and machinability makes it ideal for molds and wear resistant pieces.

Working with H13 Tool Steel

Markforged H13 Tool Steel gets harder, stronger, and tougher when heat treated. We recommend air quenching at 1010C (1850F) and double tempering at 600C (1110F). For improved hardness at the expense of part toughness, you can double temper at a lower temperature (500-550C, 930–1022F).

Metal
H13 Tool Steel

As Sintered1420 MPa
Heat Treated1500 MPa

Metal
H13 Tool Steel

As Sintered40 HRC
Heat Treated45 HRC
A-2 Tool Steel

General purpose tool steel for cold-working applications

Compatible with Metal X

When to print with A2 Tool Steel?

A2 tool steel is a highly versatile air-hardening tool steel often regarded as a “universal” cold work steel. It offers a combination of good wear resistance (between O1 and D2) and toughness.

Applications

  • Sheet metal fabrication
  • Cutting and forming prototypes
  • Wear resistant inserts
  • Punches and Dies

Metal
A2 Tool Steel

As Sintered52 HRC
Heat Treated60 HRC

NOt sure What you Need?

Check out our resources for case studies, product data sheets, videos and more.  Or contact us to speak with a knowledgeable 3D solutions specialist. 

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